Archive for the ‘sex education’ Category

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Week 55-Why do women’s nipples vary in appearance?

September 11, 2009

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Women have many different types of breasts and nipples.  Nipples can vary in colour, shape and size,  mostly determined by genetics.

The average size of a woman’s nipple is 3/8 of an inch or 10mm. The skin of a woman’s nipples are rich with nerve endings that are easily stimulated. When stimulated the nerves send a message to the muscle around the nipple and causes the muscle to become erect.

Nipples can change temporarily when women are aroused during sex.  They can get hard and erect and are sensitive to touch, air, sexual thoughts, images, and words.  Some people call this change a nipple hard-on. When sexually aroused, nipple erection is accompanied by lubrication – helping the body prepare for sexual activity. 

Nipple erection can also change with temperature – like a tactile response to cold. This can sometimes be embarrassing, but it can also just be fun.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Week 50-How soon can you get an accurate result from a pregnancy test?

August 7, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

 

how-pregnancy-tests-work-1There are different types of pregnancy tests – blood tests and urine tests.

A blood test can be accurate 8 to 10 days after ovulation – but you have to know when ovulation occurred.  A woman with a very regular menstrual cycle usually ovulates about 14 days before the first day of her period.  A blood test has to be administered by a health care provider, who will be looking for the “pregnancy hormone” hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin)

A urine test can be done by your health care provider or can be bought at a drug store, over the counter.  Most urine pregnancy tests are most accurate after a woman has missed her period-then they are about 99% effective.  If a test is done before a missed period it may still be effective – but not as conclusive.

Pregnancy tests on the market differ slightly.  Some offer high effectiveness a few days before a missed period while others detect various levels of the hormone hCG to determine the answer.  All range between $10 and $25.

Some over the counter pregnancy tests are digital – others offer name recognition.  You will notice that some come in multi packs – in case the first test is inconclusive or you need to test again the following month.

If you think you are unexpectedly pregnant and are undecided about a pregnancy, the best thing to do is get an accurate test as soon as possible.

Caution:  If a woman’s period is late and the pregnancy tests are negative but there are other symptoms synonymous with pregnancy – see your health provider.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Week 40-Is it bad if you get semen in your eyes?

May 29, 2009

eye

 

 

It is not ideal.

When it happens, it burns because there is salt, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and other substances in semen.  Flush your eye with lukewarm water if this happens.

 

 

An eye has much in common with a penis and vagina, as it is also a mucus membrane. Ok.  Maybe not much, but it is still a mucus membrane. It is a site where infections including HIV and STIs can enter the body.  The eye is not the ideal site for STIs and HIV, so the chances of contracting them is much less than through vaginal, oral or anal sex – but it can happen.

 

If you are worried you contracted an STI through a “shot” in the eye, contact your medical provider … come to Planned Parenthood for testing.

 

 

 

The best thing to do is duck, so you don’t get fertil-EYE-zed.

(Sorry about the bad pun.  Low hanging fruit is hard to resist.)

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org


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Midweek Congratulations

May 28, 2009

It appears the Midwest Teen Sex Show has been picked up by Comedy Central!

Will honest, informative and hilarious sex information be available on prime time? Perhaps even be mainstream?

One can only hope.

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Week 38-Can you get pregnant having sex in a pool?

May 15, 2009

pool

The answer is YES, you can get pregnant.

There is nothing about hot tubs, swimming pools, or any body of water for that matter, that prevents pregnancy or STI transmission.

People have been having sex in bodies of water for years.  However, it is much harder to put a condom on correctly when you are partially submerged.

Water feels great, but it can wash away the vagina’s natural lubricant and/or any lube you put on the condom.

Lastly, condoms aren’t tested for use in pools; some research states that chlorine adversely affects condoms.

The chance of being interrupted is also increased-could look bad!

All this information may make you want to stick to foreplay to the water,  and have sex poolside, or on the beach, which is another topic for another week.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Midweek-Just Say (Don’t) Know!

May 12, 2009

Who doesn’t love a good sex ed spoof (courtesy of Texas Freedom Network Education Fund – Just Say Don’t Know: Sexuality Education in Texas Public Schools)?

What kind of sex education did(n’t) you get?

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Week 32-Do 1 in 4 young women really have an STD?

April 3, 2009

“Hard to Spell, Easy to Catch”  brought to you courtesy of Peel Public Health, Ontario, Canada.

Yup.

The  CDC reports one in four U.S. teenage women between the ages of 14 and 19 are infected with a sexually transmitted infection (also known ast STDs). The highest rates are among older teens and college-age young women.

About 19 million new STDs occur amongst people of all ages in the United States.  54% of college students regularly use condoms during vaginal intercourse, 29% during anal sex and only 4% during oral sex.

One of the most common STDs is HPV – Human papillomavirus, which sometimes causes genital warts or cervical cancer -the other is Chlamydia. The CDC recommends that sexually active women under the age of 25 have annual Chlamydia screening and should be vaccinated against HPV. 

Dont wait for symptoms: women are often unaware  they are infected until symptoms worsen (and some STDs, like Chlamydia, often have no symptoms).  The best protection is to use a condom and get yourself tested.

And there is something you might not know:  Compared to their hetero sexual or lesbian counterparts, bisexual college women are at greatest risk for STDs. Researchers are unclear whether it’s the gender of their sexual partners, their number of partners, or the combination of these two factors that seem to increase the STD frequency.

April is Get Yourself Tested Month (GYT09).  Planned Parenthood health centers across the country are offering either low- or no-cost STD testing and treatment.  Click here to use the zipcode finder to find a location that works for you.

If you have an STD, you should immediately tell your sex partner/partners so they can get tested and treated if necessary. The  same goes for you – if your partner or one of your partners is diagnosed with an STD – you need to be tested and treated.

Stay tuned in coming weeks for tips on how to make safe sex sexy.

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org