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Midweek Condom Video

August 24, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

It is a bit hard for me to reconcile that this is the country that brought us something as sultry and hot as the Kama Sutra.  That said, anyone who can pull off a 6 minute video with four men singing in pastel colored condom suits and extensive choreography deserves some credit.

“I am the condom friend ever useful to you,” does have a certain ring to it.

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Week 52-What is the “G” spot?

August 21, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

As we said last week … the “G” spot is the close friend of female ejaculation.

There is a lot of debate about the “G” spot. Does it even exist? If it does, why can’t many women find it? Others claim it’s just a fake. It is believed the “G” spot is a spongy pad that surrounds the urethra. You can access the “G” spot through the vaginal canal.  It can be found by exploring the wall of your vagina – the wall closest to your stomach. It is about 1 – 2 inches up in your vagina.

Putting pressure around the vaginal opening can stimulate the “G” spot, or it can be stimulated by putting pressure on the mons. Some women can best stimulate their “G” spot by using a vibrator or a dildo. There are a variety of shapes, some are specifically effective in stimulating the area.

Some women have a lot of fluid and don’t like either the embarrassment of the ejaculate or the messiness of it. Some women truly love the stimulation of their “G” spot and the ejaculate that often accompanies that stimulation.

If you want to explore – try it yourself, feel comfortable with the feeling, try different pressures and positions, stimulate various areas of your body. Enjoy yourself.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Week 51-How common is female ejaculation?

August 14, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

Female ejaculation, casually known as “squirting”, is a natural and normal function of the female body. Although many women do not experience ejaculation, most women have the capability to ejaculate.

There is a difference between female and male ejaculation. Male ejaculation is about reproduction – the delivery of sperm from a man’s testes for the purpose of reproducing. Women ejaculate for the sole purpose of pleasure.

Female ejaculation is a function of a woman’s Para urethral glands, also known as “the female prostate. The fluid – or ejaculate – comes through a woman’s urethra and is sometimes mistaken for urine. It is not urine, although occasionally there can be a little urine in the ejaculate. Women who do ejaculate don’t do so every time they have sex or have an orgasm.

There’s lots of debate about female ejaculation – some doctors say it’s physiologically impossible for women to ejaculate. On the other hand, many women, health practitioners, doctors, and sex activists dispute this.

One of the best ways for a woman to ejaculate is to stimulate both the clitoris and G-spot when highly aroused. If comfortable with ejaculation, and at that highly aroused moment bearing down as one does when urinating – ejaculation can happen!

Next week read how the “g” spot is the close friend of female ejaculation.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Midweek “Weeds” Break

August 10, 2009

A wonderful vignette,  from Showtime’s “Weeds,” Season 5, courtesy of our colleagues at Planned Parenthood of NYC.  Alannis Morissette stars as an unflappable ob/gyn and Andy (Justin Kirk) is as charming as ever, jumping protestor lines to get himself a date.  Click on Alannis to view 2 minutes of “Laugh with the Sinners”

allanis

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Week 50-How soon can you get an accurate result from a pregnancy test?

August 7, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

 

how-pregnancy-tests-work-1There are different types of pregnancy tests – blood tests and urine tests.

A blood test can be accurate 8 to 10 days after ovulation – but you have to know when ovulation occurred.  A woman with a very regular menstrual cycle usually ovulates about 14 days before the first day of her period.  A blood test has to be administered by a health care provider, who will be looking for the “pregnancy hormone” hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin)

A urine test can be done by your health care provider or can be bought at a drug store, over the counter.  Most urine pregnancy tests are most accurate after a woman has missed her period-then they are about 99% effective.  If a test is done before a missed period it may still be effective – but not as conclusive.

Pregnancy tests on the market differ slightly.  Some offer high effectiveness a few days before a missed period while others detect various levels of the hormone hCG to determine the answer.  All range between $10 and $25.

Some over the counter pregnancy tests are digital – others offer name recognition.  You will notice that some come in multi packs – in case the first test is inconclusive or you need to test again the following month.

If you think you are unexpectedly pregnant and are undecided about a pregnancy, the best thing to do is get an accurate test as soon as possible.

Caution:  If a woman’s period is late and the pregnancy tests are negative but there are other symptoms synonymous with pregnancy – see your health provider.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Midweek iPhone Passion Update

August 3, 2009

original chartAccording to the Telegraph, there is now an iPhone app that lets you measure your passion.

“Users simply start the programme, strap the phone to their arm or belt, and press ‘stop’ when lovemaking is over. The programme then gives a rating from ‘bad’ to ‘perfect’ on three criteria – duration, activity, and orgasm.”

I am wondering if there isn’t a conflict of interest between being passionate and having to say “Babe, just give me a minute.  I have to strap on my…iPhone.”

This just raises a bunch of questions:  Have low battery iPhones given a non-orgasm result and started a lover’s quarrel? Can you send results to your Facebook page? Tweet them?  What if I have a Blackberry? Will “I really liked him, but I looked at his passion app, and it turns out he didn’t really measure up”  be heard on the dating circuit?

For now, a good old-fashioned romp, without graphs, technology & measurable results, with blissful exhaustion as a sufficient indicator, may what most of us have to settle for.

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Week 49-Are scented tampons dangerous?

July 31, 2009

CottonPlantsmConsensual Text is featured on Twitter, along with other information relating to a range of topics.

Scented tampons are not good to use. Commercial tampon manufacturers use artificial fragrance to create flowery fresh scents.  The perfumes used can irritate vaginal walls and it’s also an easy way to get a yeast infection.   Although scented tampons are marketed, they are not recommended.

It is best to use unscented tampons. 

Scenting is also unnecessary-there shouldn’t be a bad odor from your period. If you think there is, try changing your tampon more often. If the odor continues, call your health care provider.

Ideally, you would also use tampons made of organic cotton.

According to Seventh Generation, there are some pretty good reasons for this:

“…an incredible 55 million pounds of pesticides are sprayed on cotton fields each year in the US… The World Health Organization classifies many of
these pesticides as “extremely or highly hazardous”. Five of the nine most commonly used cotton pesticides have been identified as possible human carcinogens. Others are known to damage the nervous system and are suspected of disrupting the body’s hormonal system.”

Not something you want near your fun parts.

On other related tampon questions,we are often asked: “can you masturbate with a tampon in your vagina?”

Yes, you can … if it’s comfortable for you, then there is no problem.

Some basic tampon advice:

  • Change tampons regularly – don’t leave in for a long time.
  • Don’t use scented tampons
  • Don’t leave a tampon in your vagina overnight
  • Try using organic cotton tampons – there are some good brands on the market

If you have any problems with odor or irritation, have it checked out.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org