Posts Tagged ‘anal sex’

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Week 54-What are the complications of anal sex?

September 4, 2009

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A few months back, one of our readers wanted to know how common anal sex was. Turns out 40% of men and 35% of women between the ages of 15 and 44 engage in heterosexual anal sex.   But to answer this week’s question, we will focus on the more risky aspects of engaging in anal sex.

What exactly are the complications associated with this sexual act?

It is easy to tear the tissue in the anal canal and rectum.  The lining of the anal canal is thin and has no natural lubrication.  Adding friction to the mix makes tearing possible. If there is enough force, the sphincter muscle can also tear. Go slowly and pay attention to how it feels. Stop when you feel it’s too uncomfortable.

 Spread of STIs and HIV.  Because the lining of the anus tears easily, it offers an easy path for bacteria and viruses to enter blood stream.  To avoid the spread of STIs and HIV, always use a condom.

The deeper you go, the more likely the tear.  The inner third of the rectum is less sensitive, meaning you could tear tissue and not even know it right away.  If you have prolonged pain after having anal sex, definitely go see your doctor.

Sex toys can be hard to retrieve.  Certain toys can be hard to reach after anal sex, and in some instances, need to be surgically removed. “Sorry, I can’t come into work today because I have to get a sex toy removed,” is NOT something you ever want to utter to your boss.  Make sure you’re using equipment specifically designed for anal sex.  You’ll want toys with flared ends which will prevent the toy from moving up into the rectum.

Beware of bacteria.  Bacteria from your anus can often negatively affect the healthy environment of your vagina.   If you choose to have both vaginal and anal sex, use a new condom when moving from one locale to the other.

The Bottom Line.  Anal sex always involves fecal matter, no matter what you do to prevent it.  Always wash well before and after anal sex .  Use a condom, use gloves.  Don’t let a little fecal matter affect your health.

 Tips

  • Take it slow
  •  Pay attention to how it’s feeling
  • Stop when and if you feel uncomfortable.
  • Have fun

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Week 39-Is anal sex a common practice?

May 22, 2009

 

lupanarAlthough the topic of anal sex is often considered taboo, the CDC reports approximately 40% of men and 35% of women between the ages of 15 and 44 have engaged in heterosexual anal sex. Approximately 3.7% of men surveyed reported engaging in anal sex with other men.

Most important: if you engage in anal sex – use a condom.  Unprotected anal sex is 5 times more risky than vaginal sex and 50 times more risky than oral sex when it comes to contracting HIV.  Those are important facts!

Know your partner’s and your own STD status.

For both men and women the anus has many sensitive nerve endings that make it a great area for sexual stimulation. For men, stimulation of the prostate gland can be very pleasurable. 

If you decide to have anal sex –

  • Use lots of water-based lube
  • If you use a dildo make sure it is soft and flexible
  • If you are using your fingers, make sure fingernails are clipped
  • ALWAYS proceed slowly, listen to your partner.  If your partner says stop – absolutely stop.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

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Week 34-What are some creative uses for plastic wrap? Read it, but if you click anywhere on this post, you can read our retraction of this information

April 17, 2009

What are some creative uses for plastic wrap?  Read it, but if you click anywhere on this post, you can read our retraction of this information.

plastic-wrap1

Here’s the thing about plastic wrap – it’s easily available…and it’s a barrier method that will protect you during oral or anal sex. 

Plastic wrap is in most kitchen drawers.  To use it – roll out a big piece and cover the entire area of the genitals with which you ar engaging.  Plastic wrap is strong and can be held in place over the vaginal opening – or wrapped around a penis – or over the anus.  If used correctly it will protect you from HIV or an STD.

Plastic wrap between your mouth and your partner’s genitals will keep blood and/vaginal fluids/semen or pre-cum fluids from entering your mouth.

Most importantly, in the heat of the moment – don’t put a piece of plastic wrap down and then pick it up again – only use plastic wrap once!

Plastic wrap can also be used over other parts of your body – as a turn on, enticement, and a fun way to get “things going”.  Wrap yourself up!

Using plastic wrap will protect you against HIV when engaging in anal sex– and it should be used during oral sex as well.  Although vaginal and anal sex can pass HIV more easily – engaging in oral sex is not a safe practice.  Use a barrier like shrink wrap whenever you have anal or oral sex.   Have fun with plastic – wrap it up!

 

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

 

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Week 10-What is frottage?

October 31, 2008

To receive the weekly question per text, text FACTS to 90999.  

Frottage, from the French “frotter” (to rub),  is getting sexual pleasure from rubbing up against someone or something–it is the technical term for “dry humping”, also known as “outercourse”.

If frottage is a mutually consensual affair, it is considered safe sex and can be performed either naked or clothed. Dressed or not, frottage is safer than oral, anal or vaginal sex, as no bodily fluids are exchanged. 

And remember, Wednesday is hump day!

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.  

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org