Posts Tagged ‘STDs’

h1

Week 54-What are the complications of anal sex?

September 4, 2009

Consensual Text is featured on Twitter and on Facebook .  Fan and follow us for info on a range of topics pertaining to sex and sexual health!

A few months back, one of our readers wanted to know how common anal sex was. Turns out 40% of men and 35% of women between the ages of 15 and 44 engage in heterosexual anal sex.   But to answer this week’s question, we will focus on the more risky aspects of engaging in anal sex.

What exactly are the complications associated with this sexual act?

It is easy to tear the tissue in the anal canal and rectum.  The lining of the anal canal is thin and has no natural lubrication.  Adding friction to the mix makes tearing possible. If there is enough force, the sphincter muscle can also tear. Go slowly and pay attention to how it feels. Stop when you feel it’s too uncomfortable.

 Spread of STIs and HIV.  Because the lining of the anus tears easily, it offers an easy path for bacteria and viruses to enter blood stream.  To avoid the spread of STIs and HIV, always use a condom.

The deeper you go, the more likely the tear.  The inner third of the rectum is less sensitive, meaning you could tear tissue and not even know it right away.  If you have prolonged pain after having anal sex, definitely go see your doctor.

Sex toys can be hard to retrieve.  Certain toys can be hard to reach after anal sex, and in some instances, need to be surgically removed. “Sorry, I can’t come into work today because I have to get a sex toy removed,” is NOT something you ever want to utter to your boss.  Make sure you’re using equipment specifically designed for anal sex.  You’ll want toys with flared ends which will prevent the toy from moving up into the rectum.

Beware of bacteria.  Bacteria from your anus can often negatively affect the healthy environment of your vagina.   If you choose to have both vaginal and anal sex, use a new condom when moving from one locale to the other.

The Bottom Line.  Anal sex always involves fecal matter, no matter what you do to prevent it.  Always wash well before and after anal sex .  Use a condom, use gloves.  Don’t let a little fecal matter affect your health.

 Tips

  • Take it slow
  •  Pay attention to how it’s feeling
  • Stop when and if you feel uncomfortable.
  • Have fun

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

Advertisements
h1

Midweek STD Postcards

June 1, 2009

ISIS Inc. is a pioneer in “mating” sexual health and technology. They have developed some smart and hip e-cards for you to send.

No, not cute puppies and curly fonts about how much you miss your summer camp bunkmates.  These e-cards take the sting out of a potentially awkward exchange:    “I may have given you an STD.”

tell_card2_popOr like this:

tell_card4_pop

Sexy and smart!

h1

Week 39-Is anal sex a common practice?

May 22, 2009

 

lupanarAlthough the topic of anal sex is often considered taboo, the CDC reports approximately 40% of men and 35% of women between the ages of 15 and 44 have engaged in heterosexual anal sex. Approximately 3.7% of men surveyed reported engaging in anal sex with other men.

Most important: if you engage in anal sex – use a condom.  Unprotected anal sex is 5 times more risky than vaginal sex and 50 times more risky than oral sex when it comes to contracting HIV.  Those are important facts!

Know your partner’s and your own STD status.

For both men and women the anus has many sensitive nerve endings that make it a great area for sexual stimulation. For men, stimulation of the prostate gland can be very pleasurable. 

If you decide to have anal sex –

  • Use lots of water-based lube
  • If you use a dildo make sure it is soft and flexible
  • If you are using your fingers, make sure fingernails are clipped
  • ALWAYS proceed slowly, listen to your partner.  If your partner says stop – absolutely stop.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

h1

Week 38-Can you get pregnant having sex in a pool?

May 15, 2009

pool

The answer is YES, you can get pregnant.

There is nothing about hot tubs, swimming pools, or any body of water for that matter, that prevents pregnancy or STI transmission.

People have been having sex in bodies of water for years.  However, it is much harder to put a condom on correctly when you are partially submerged.

Water feels great, but it can wash away the vagina’s natural lubricant and/or any lube you put on the condom.

Lastly, condoms aren’t tested for use in pools; some research states that chlorine adversely affects condoms.

The chance of being interrupted is also increased-could look bad!

All this information may make you want to stick to foreplay to the water,  and have sex poolside, or on the beach, which is another topic for another week.

Planned Parenthood of northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

h1

Week 36-Does saliva carry HPV (human papilloma virus)?

May 1, 2009

STDs (sexually transmitted diseases/infections) spread in two ways:

  • through bodily fluids ( semen, vaginal secretions, blood, pre-cum)  These fluids are passed from partner to partner during vaginal, oral or anal sex.
  • through skin–to-skin contact. (Genital HPV can spread by rubbing against an infected partner skin-to-skin or by touching an infected person’s genitals, then touching yourself. )

Saliva itself does not transmit HPV but,  skin-to-skin contact can.  LIPS ARE SKIN!

Activities you do on your own, such as masturbate,  do not transmit STDs. 

Some HPV facts:

  • There are more than a hundred types of HPV – about 40 types can infect your genitals – vulva, vagina, penis, scrotum, anus, or rectum.
  • Genital HPV is quite common – about 50% of men and 75% of women have HPV at some time in their lived– most people are unaware.
  • Although most HPV infections go away within 6-8 months – some do not. HPV can lay dormant for several years, making it impossible/difficult to know when you were infected and to whom you may have passed the infection.
  • Some types of HPV are “high risk” types and can result in cervical cancer or other genital cancers.

 Use condoms!  Get Yourself Tested!  Kiss Often! Kiss A Lot!

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org

h1

Goddess has Penile Thoughts

April 28, 2009

Due to warmer weather and general spring fever, the Goddess briefly became unhinged: in Week 34, she actually advised gentlemen to wrap their member in plastic wrap.

While this may be a heap of fun, it is not advisable from a sexual health perspective.  So, ladies and gentlemen, please wrap your favorite penises in plastic wrap as you wish, but note that this practice is a definite “no-no” if you are looking to prevent STIs (sexually transmitted infections) or pregnancy.

Sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy can ensue.  What was she thinking?

Sincerely,

Goddess Management

h1

Week 32-Do 1 in 4 young women really have an STD?

April 3, 2009

“Hard to Spell, Easy to Catch”  brought to you courtesy of Peel Public Health, Ontario, Canada.

Yup.

The  CDC reports one in four U.S. teenage women between the ages of 14 and 19 are infected with a sexually transmitted infection (also known ast STDs). The highest rates are among older teens and college-age young women.

About 19 million new STDs occur amongst people of all ages in the United States.  54% of college students regularly use condoms during vaginal intercourse, 29% during anal sex and only 4% during oral sex.

One of the most common STDs is HPV – Human papillomavirus, which sometimes causes genital warts or cervical cancer -the other is Chlamydia. The CDC recommends that sexually active women under the age of 25 have annual Chlamydia screening and should be vaccinated against HPV. 

Dont wait for symptoms: women are often unaware  they are infected until symptoms worsen (and some STDs, like Chlamydia, often have no symptoms).  The best protection is to use a condom and get yourself tested.

And there is something you might not know:  Compared to their hetero sexual or lesbian counterparts, bisexual college women are at greatest risk for STDs. Researchers are unclear whether it’s the gender of their sexual partners, their number of partners, or the combination of these two factors that seem to increase the STD frequency.

April is Get Yourself Tested Month (GYT09).  Planned Parenthood health centers across the country are offering either low- or no-cost STD testing and treatment.  Click here to use the zipcode finder to find a location that works for you.

If you have an STD, you should immediately tell your sex partner/partners so they can get tested and treated if necessary. The  same goes for you – if your partner or one of your partners is diagnosed with an STD – you need to be tested and treated.

Stay tuned in coming weeks for tips on how to make safe sex sexy.

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Education Department carefully selects all weekly questions. All questions are actual inquiries made to PPNNE by college-aged students.

Should you have a question you would like to see included, please send an email to goddess@ppnne.org